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(Photo courtesy of Google.)

(Photo courtesy of Google.)

(Photo courtesy of Google.)

Angeline Schmelzer, Editor-in-chief

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It might only be the start of second semester, but students are already thinking about next school year. It is that time of year where eighth graders to juniors select classes for the 2018-2019 school year.

It might not seem all too important now, but the choices you make now can alter your future.

James Benes, a counselor here at Shepard, addressed the most common issue when it comes to selecting classes for the upcoming year. “One of the biggest mistakes is when they don’t realize the importance of, and how, these choices can/will lead to future opportunities regardless of what their next step is in life,” said Benes.

According to Benes psychology, foods, and CAD are popular electives students decide to take.

“It’s important to consider what classes will connect you to your desired career and/or post-secondary option of your choice,” said counselor Brittney Gray. “It’s also important to consider level of interest, this reduces the chance of too many changes on the backend.”

Most juniors have to decide what senior English electives to take and whether or not to continue with math and science.

Some of the most common English electives are Man, Myth, and Monsters, Graphic Novels, Film and Lit, and Best Selling Novels.

In these classes, students analyze elements of literature in a variety of ways unique to the class. Check the course selection guide for more details.

If students decide that the class they chose is not what they want to take, they can switch the course until February 2, but then all classes are locked in until May.

Students also have to decide whether or not to go the AP route. AP courses are college level classes that can qualify for college credit, depending on the score of the AP exam taken in May.

There are questions they must ask themselves if they are thinking about an AP class. “Are they willing to put in the work so that they can reap the benefits down the line,” said Benes.  “AP courses are not instant gratification.  The benefits are down the road.  Is the student willing to put in the work now to get the advantage later?”

According to counselor Joan Alderden a student should have a good work ethic and have interest in the study before opting to enroll in an AP course.

According to Gray, a teacher recommendation can also be helpful when debating about AP courses.

When deciding next year’s classes, think about your future. “It’s not what to get out, it’s what to get in,” Alderden said. “Choose classes that will keep all future opportunities open.  Choose classes that are required to graduate, will help you with future careers, and will get you into the college of your choice.”

*Choose the classes that you want to take, not the ones that your friends are taking. Take the courses that seem most interesting to you and the ones that will benefit you the most.

 

*Some personal advice that I wanted to add. You’re Welcome! 🙂

 

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